A Level retakes and transfers

A Level retakes and transfers

A level Retakes and Intensive One Year Courses, Day or Boarding

Students underperform in A level examinations for many reasons: lack of confidence, lack of commitment and illness are a few of the most common. However, the invariably awful disappointment on the day the results are issued often leads to the most important step on the road to improvement which is an absolute determination never to go through it again. Students usually decide to retake before they go off to try a university course but sometimes the decision comes after a disappointing start in Higher Education.

The one thing to remember is that retaking A-levels does not diminish your chances of attending a top university and, through the years, RIC has enabled retake students to actually improve their future academic prospects as students leave us to start degree programmes they initially thought beyond their reach before joining us. The effect of a retake course can be truly transformative.

At RIC students often combine retaking A levels with fresh one year courses to target their first choice university and make their academic gap year more engaging. RIC offers full UCAS support for students retaking A levels to ensure that their new application is carefully put together.

Class sizes are extremely small on A level resit courses, usually numbering around six to eight which means that every student has individual attention.

Improvements of five or six grades are by no means unheard of even on an A level resit course, however, improvements of two or three grades are more common.

We encourage our students to see their year retaking A levels at RIC as a university preparatory course rather than an A level resit one and previous students often comment that their time here was the most enjoyable and productive of their secondary education. It can be very reassuring to join A level resit classes with students from different schools all of whom are in the same position and have made the decision not to compromise and aim for their first choice university courses.

Small classes and the easy accessibility of staff ensure that students receive a great deal of individual help and attention. Regular tests under examination conditions are designed to help those who suffer from `examination nerves’ and prepare them for public examinations. Teaching time is plentiful meaning that the courses are more structured than is often the case in school.

Changing Schools for Year 13

Every September up to 60 students join RIC directly into Year 13 for their final year of sixth form as either day or boarding students. RIC is able to offer teaching on all exam boards for most subjects so switching schools can be done with ease.

We prepare our students for success: their hard work and first-class results mean they go on to win places at a wide range of top UK universities.

With reformed A levels you may not be entered for the new AS exams at the end of Year 12. However it is still the case that you may benefit from a fresh start in Year 13.

Transferring to RIC means that you will be able to take a fresh look at your subjects and maybe switch one or two, taking our successful one-year A level courses.

Our tutors and UCAS advisors are often able to quickly make credible grade predictions based on assessment of potential over the year here rather than prior achievement elsewhere.

Students also move directly into RIC’s sixth form after a disappointing first year of the IB Diploma programme.

If you need to stick with your original subjects you’ll revise everything from your first year carefully alongside the second year material. You’ll catch up, consolidate and be back on track to realize your potential and achieve your academic ambitions.

International students looking for direct entry into Year 13 will find themselves studying alongside students from all over the world.

Students move directly into Year 13 at RIC from a range of local and international schools.

Transferring mid A levels is also an option, particularly if disappointing results have knocked confidence or students want to change direction and not lose a year.